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Dr. Joel Henzie

World Premier International (WPI) Research Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA)

National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044, Japan.

E-mail : HENZIE.Joeladam@nims.go.jp
Tel : +81-29-860-4824

Research ID: B-9564-2013

Research Activities

The role of nanoparticle shape can be as important as crystal chemistry in determining the electronic and catalytic properties of inorganic clusters and nanoparticles. Yet the chemistry governing shape at this length scale is not well understood, especially in binary and ternary materials. We are using a combination of simulation, structural analysis and high-precision synthetic techniques to discover a common origin of shape in different nanomaterials systems, with special attention on classes of materials useful for enhanced light absorbance and catalysis (1).

   We treat these nanocrystals as “building blocks” for a new class of functional, porous architectures that can be completely assembled from the bottom up (2). Over the years many synthetic methods have been developed to generate particles with exquisite control of shape and size in metal, dielectric and semiconductor materials. Our focus is on arranging these building blocks into precisely ordered lattices, where they become the component "atoms" of new, functional porous materials with unusual physical and chemical properties that cannot be found in nature. We are interested in both the fundamental science of self-assembly, and diverse applications including bio-molecular sensing (3), metamaterials and plasmon-enhanced catalysis.

By tuning interparticle forces in octahedral Ag nanocrystals, we can create a material that is ~12% more porous than its densest packing (SEM: Left, Middle). Monte Carlo modeling can show how these particles assemble, and what forces are required (Right).

By tuning interparticle forces in octahedral Ag nanocrystals, we can create a material that is ~12% more porous than its densest packing (SEM: Left, Middle). Monte Carlo modeling can show how these particles assemble, and what forces are required (Right).

Selected References:

  1. Henzie, J; Andrews, S; Ling, X; Li, Z; Yang, P.; "Oriented Assembly of Polyhedral Plasmonic Nanoparticle Clusters"; Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci.; 2013; 110, 6640-6645.

  2. Henzie, J; Grünwald, M; Widmer-Cooper, A; Geissler, P; Yang, P.; "Self-assembly of uniform polyhedral silver nanocrystals into densest packings and exotic superlattices"; Nature Materials; 2012; 11, 131-137.

  3. Wu, H.-J.; Henzie, J.; Lin, W.-C.; Rhodes, C.; Li, Z.; Thorner, J.; Yang, P.; Groves, J. T.; "Membrane-Protein Binding Measured with Solution-Phase Plasmonic Nanocube Sensors"; Nature Methods; 2012; 9, 1189-1191.